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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
smith, thank you for coming. i represent about 30 or 40 entertainment venues in san francisco, new york, and moscow is. i have a technical question about county transfers. -- and lost vegas. i have a technical question about county transfers. right now, there are very few buildings that you can lease in san francisco anymore. this town has gone nuts in the last five or six months. there are no liquor licenses to purchase. i have strong connections with the liquor licenses on line and some of these people. i am sorry that the top of the list. i have 48 license requests that i cannot fail. i have a two-star michelin restaurant that is moving from downtown out into the mission that the only thing i can do is throw a quick 41 on the place because we can -- because i cannot find a 47 or 848 to do it. i would like you -- or a 48 to do it. i would like to think about some injured county transfers. -- enter-county transfers. there are a lot of restaurants that have a million dollar construction costs and cannot find a license and are freaking out. licensing has gone to about 128,000 this month.
. [applause] >> good afternoon everyone. i am rachel smith falls and a senior vice president here of futures without violence i wanted to thank you all for being here and formally welcome to futures without violence. as many of you know of the former name had that for close to 30 years and when we moved to this building we changed our name to futures without violence and for many reasons and it really does reflect the work that we do in the mission. we are here to create futures without violence and we believe it's possibility when we stand in solidity with people like yourself and i want to thank you for being here. you are one of the first groups to hold a all day conference in this space. we are open to suggestions if you have ideas or using the space for your own organizations. we are up and running in this part of the conference center and in a year and a half we will open the rest of the building and has a public exhibition that deals with the topics you're talking about today and bullying and education and creating the future we want for our families and children and if you for com
. >> thank you. >> oh, and we are members of the ggra as well. >> hello. my name is caribbean smith karen smith and i have been involved with this since the beginning before supervisor wiener got involved and he has done a great job. i have an email from boma, if i could read it for you. he wanted me to emphasize the unfairness of allowing one type of small business to use public property to compete for business against other small businesses many of whom have been pillars of the community for years. the intent of the original legislation was to bring wholesome and diverse food opportunities to underserved parts of the san francisco. did wasn't meant to harm existing establishments, but that is what is happening in the financial district aye 50' radius or 1/6th of an average city block is not enough of a buffer to protect our existing small restaurants, cafe and delis and shops. it doesn't matter if it's 60'. 300' to 50' and now they are trying to revise the ordinance from a 300-food radius to a property line of 50-feet. if you had a brick-and-mortar restaurant and you wanted to expand i
service and sacrifice for his nation and people. indeed that of his colleagues, glen dougherty, sean smith, tyrone woods. i know you all join me in honoring and appreciating their service and devotion as well. chris and i worked together for a time almost a dozen years ago. he was even then fully committed to his work. an authority already in the middle east. a fine student of arabic. much more. he gave me careful and cogent advice and council as we wrestled together with the many growing problems that even back then were en endemic to the country's work. i learned about benghazi, as the critical changes in libya began to unfold. his leadership there at a time of great importance and danger was a tribute to his courage and bravery. his skill and dedication as a diplomat. to his commitment to a new and better libya. benghazi in a real sense, as you have heard today, became his city. as it is with a deep sense of fate that in benghazi he and his colleagues gave that last full measure for his country and his many friends in the city where he died, continuing to defend and prosper their hopes
have victor par and oscar lab tory and sean smith and adriane simy and carl with the local carpenters 22, danny campbell with the sheet metal workers and the operating engineers -- who am i missing? ramone hernandez right behind me. i should have looked back. [applause] and additionally
will remember most. [applause] >> now, we get to meet novela smith, milton's former campaign manager and friend. >> i would like to thank abbey for asking me to speak today. i'm humbled abbey. thank you very much. most of you don't know me, so i'm going to keep this pretty brief. for those that don't know i was his campaign manager in 2004. he wanted to be board president -- excuse me, that was beautiful because he wanted to refocus the college board. i was really surprised when milton asked me to run his campaign. i didn't know him very well. since i only ran campaigns for people i knew, and for people who are interested in education and children, i was sort of surprised to find him on my door step. excuse me. so i didn't know enough about him to really say "yes" so i decided to ask around about him. l you can imagine the surprise i heard from people. they loved him. he was beloved by everyone that i respected in education and politics, so i decided to call him and meet with him, and on our first meeting we had so much fun that i decided -- who cares? at least i will have fun with
and oscar lab tory and sean smith and adriane simy and carl with the local carpenters 22, danny campbell with the sheet metal workers and the operating engineers -- who am i missing? ramone hernandez right behind me. i should have looked back. [applause] and additionally mike mc kenny with electricians and tim paulson with the labor council and mike casey president in the back of the room over there. this is a project of the kind that makes building trades workers salivate. it is a startingly beautiful design from what we have seen so far. i am going to embarrass myself and speak in norwegian and it's the kind of project where we can look forward to bringing our skills to work on a project that will fully demand those skills, so that is quite apart from the hours it will bring to us, it quite a part from the food we will put on the table and the house payments and so on. that's one of the reasons this project really excites us and it's a dramatic project. however, we are happy to try to minimize the drama of actually building the project and this is what this particular agreement d a
smith in oakland has an initiative that is dealing with not just things like restoretive justice alone but positive behavioral interventions and supports. couple that with response to intervention, whole school reform strategies that work on transforming the way the school is functioning and in so doing making it a more positive culture for everybody. it brings in parental engagement in families and it has the very tough conversations, in the case of oakland i know for sure, around things like race with an african american male focus in that community because it's appropriate for that community, and the way all these things link together. so certainly bullying and harassment is an avenue into transforming the way schools work. just like discipline is an avenue into transforming the way schools work, as is standards and good assessments, it is how all these things fit together to ensure that students feel safe to learn but that what they are learning are the rigorous courses and skills and they are challenged enough to stay in school, graduate, and meet our president's goal we're goin
another one over there, tony smith from oakland, the sort of heroes that are deeply trying to transform their communities and recognize that this is also a community issue, that it is not just a school issue. >> tom, why don't we have a federal definition? >> well, we're working on it. i mean, i think there's a, when we had the white house conference there was a conversation about what is the federal role and there continues to be i think a robust debate in this country about whether education issues are local issues, whether they are federal issues, and what should be done. and there are a number of people --. >> tom, let me jump in. bullying is hardly unique to school day. >> uh-huh. >> so why in the broadier sense is there not a federal definition of bullying that transcends local jurisdiction on schools? meaning, we know what bullying is when we see it. everyone may have a variation, about why isn't there a broad definition? >> certainly in the south philly case, a number of those kids were dealt with in the local criminal justice system because they committed an assault, a prett
that, as tony smith was talking about, creating caring climate, a culture of trust and respect. and that's hard and needs to, top down but also bottom up. i just recently viewed the movie bully and brought back a lot of memories, it brought back a focus on just the cruel course of bullying and the insensitivity, the interviews with administrators and school personnel. i don't know if any of you have seen the movie or a preview of it, it's just an appalling, republic prehence sibl, the ignorance . my beloved niece took her own life a couple miles from here. she was a special needs child and it's hard to know what happened, but this story of grief and then the turn around in the movie was really positive because it emphasized the positive that was coming out of the tragedy. so for rob and for the mom over here who grieves, you have the idea i am somebody. in the movie there's tee shirts, i am somebody, everything starts with one. we got to go from here forward and replacing hate with hope. so those were good themes that came out of that movie. the department of education,
and i partner with tony smith and this man brought innovation to the oakland school district which has a lot of challenges which he may go into. i won't. so i really echo what jeff said about soft or hard power but let me tell you from my standpoint. i have a nephew who was in school and was bullied and there were sexual overtones to it and the result is he left the school and i spent time working with the school and my district and it wasn't my area and educate them about what bullying meant and in the most heinous way described to them and it went no where and that gave me the lesson in life we have children that are in fear when they go to school so they don't go and my priority is to have safe schools and they can be educated and create their path to a successful future and it's a healthy environment and bullying prevents that for so many kids. when terreesa and i addressed issues around truancies and one of the common themes and i saw this before with sexually exploited cases and kids were afraid to go to school because of the terrorism going on and with bullying it's flat out
. a special thanks to my husgreg husband greg smith. [ applause ] greg let us cut his birthday trip to hawaii short by a day and fly back on his birthday, so i could be here today. so if you wouldn't mind saying happy birthday greg. happy birthday greg! so this is a threshold, a beginning, a start. we're going to build a new library. there are a couple of other starts today. today is the start of the effort to raise money to furnish and equip that library. the friends of the library have done an incredible job of doing that with 23 other branches. we're the last. we don't want to tiredly limp over that finish line. we want to show them what our neighborhood can do. so you are going to be getting the asks. the ask is to be able to help with that effort to furnish our library and equip it to make it the best library in the city of san francisco. so stay tuned, we need your help again. one more and that is prop b. how many people are going to vote in this election? can i see a show of hands? how many people will vote for prop b? >> yes. >> how many of you can think of at least two or three
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)